Reflection

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Claiming Our Callings: Toward a New Understanding of Vocation in the Liberal Arts
eds Schwehn, Kaethe and Lagerquist DAL. Claiming Our Callings: Toward a New Understanding of Vocation in the Liberal Arts. Oxford; 2014.Abstract

Kaethe Schwehn and L. DeAne Lagerquist offer perspectives from fourteen professors at St. Olaf College on the value of vocation, showing how a focus on one's calling rather than on success or credentials paves the way for the civic good sought by defenders of liberal arts education. The essays in this volume exemplify the reflective practices at the heart of liberal arts, for faculty and students alike. Martin E. Marty once said that "The vocation of St. Olaf is vocation," and the contributors draw on their experiences teaching in a range of departments-from biology and economics to history and religion-to reflect on both their calling as professors and their practices for fostering students' ability to identify their own vocations. These scholars' varied notions of how vocation is best understood and cultivated reveal the differing religious commitments and pedagogical practices present within their college community. Together they demonstrate how the purposes of their own lives intersect creatively with the purposes of higher education and the needs of their students and the world.

What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World
Seelig T. What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World. HaperOne; 2009.Abstract

Advice for young adults, including the transition from school to career, entrepreneurship, and how to turn mistakes and challenges into opportunities.

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Turning to One Another; Simple Conversations to Restore Hope to the Future
Wheatley M. Turning to One Another; Simple Conversations to Restore Hope to the Future. Berrett-Koehler; 2009.Abstract

"I believe we can change the world if we start talking to one another again."  With this simple declaration, Margaret Wheatley proposes that people band together with their colleagues and friends to create the solutions for real social change, both locally and globally, that are so badly needed. Such change will not come from governments or corporations, she argues, but from the ageless process of thinking together in conversation. "Turning to One Another" encourages this process. Part I explores the power of conversation and the conditions-simplicity, personal courage, real listening, and diversity-that support it. Part II contains quotes and images to encourage the reader to pause and reflect, and to prepare for the work ahead-convening truly meaningful conversations. Part III provides twelve ""conversation starters""-questions that in Wheatley's experience have led people to share their deepest beliefs, fears, and hopes.