Publications

Featured Publications

A Conspiracy of Goodness: Contemporary Images of Christian Mission
Messer D. A Conspiracy of Goodness: Contemporary Images of Christian Mission. Abingdon; 1992.Abstract

After describing the biblical mandates for the mission of ministry, Dr. Messer calls church leaders to:

  • understand the world as God's body
  • live as a covenant of global gardeners
  • work as bridge builders
  • form a company of star-throwers and peacemakers
  • embrace a community of fence movers.
A Sacred Voice is Calling: Personal Vocation and Social Conscience
Neafsey J. A Sacred Voice is Calling: Personal Vocation and Social Conscience. Orbis Books; 2006.Abstract

What does it mean to find and follow our personal calling? How do we distinguish between the "still, small voice" of our authentic vocation and all of the other competing counterfeit voices in ourselves and in our culture? Specifically, how do we balance the inward listening to our hearts and the need to listen with our hearts to the realities and needs of our world? Drawing widely on the wisdom of saints, sages, and the traditions of spiritual direction, Neafsey describes a path to living in the place, as Frederick Buechner has put it, "where our deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet."

Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith
Parks SD. Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. Jossey-Bass; 2011.Abstract

Building on the foundation she established with her ground-breaking book, The Critical Years, Parks invites us to take up responsibility for providing thoughtful mentorship and mentoring environments during the wilderness years of young adulthood. In this updated edition she addresses recent current events: violence in our culture, smart phones, mixed spirituality/religious identities, social media/networking, the economic crisis, changing racial identity, cultural shifts and other forces shaping the narrative of young adulthood today. She provides concrete ways of employing the theory in different types of mentoring communities, more on the relationship between meaning-making (faith/religion/spirituality) and disciplinary learning and includes new (and more timely) stories and illustrations.

Caminemos con Jesus: Toward a Hispanic/Latino Theology of Accompaniment
Goizueta RS. Caminemos con Jesus: Toward a Hispanic/Latino Theology of Accompaniment. Orbis Books; 1995.Abstract

While the growth in both numbers and influence of Hispanics in North American Catholicism and Protestantism has been commented on widely, up until now there has been no systematic attempt to define a Hispanic theology...In delineating the very particular nature and worldview of Hispanic/Latino theology, Caminemos con Jesus challenges both traditional Euro-American theologies and modern Western epistemological assumptions. It examines the implications of this theological method for the Church and the academy, as well as for the future of the Latino community and North American society...

Claiming Our Callings: Toward a New Understanding of Vocation in the Liberal Arts
eds Schwehn, Kaethe and Lagerquist DAL. Claiming Our Callings: Toward a New Understanding of Vocation in the Liberal Arts. Oxford; 2014.Abstract

Kaethe Schwehn and L. DeAne Lagerquist offer perspectives from fourteen professors at St. Olaf College on the value of vocation, showing how a focus on one's calling rather than on success or credentials paves the way for the civic good sought by defenders of liberal arts education. The essays in this volume exemplify the reflective practices at the heart of liberal arts, for faculty and students alike. Martin E. Marty once said that "The vocation of St. Olaf is vocation," and the contributors draw on their experiences teaching in a range of departments-from biology and economics to history and religion-to reflect on both their calling as professors and their practices for fostering students' ability to identify their own vocations. These scholars' varied notions of how vocation is best understood and cultivated reveal the differing religious commitments and pedagogical practices present within their college community. Together they demonstrate how the purposes of their own lives intersect creatively with the purposes of higher education and the needs of their students and the world.